(Source: palpattine, via thesappiest)

finalzidane-x:

nyx-010:

horroriskiller:

The boy who played Danny in “The Shining” had no idea he was filming for a horror movie. From Cracked: 

Lloyd just thought they were making a movie about a family in a hotel. He wasn’t even really sure how much he was getting paid to be there. He was only ever shown severely edited footage that took out all the scary parts, which essentially means he thought he was filming the most boring snoozefest ever created, because without the iconic scenes of terror, The Shining is a movie about three people wandering around in cavernous, brooding silence.
Lloyd didn’t see the actual uncut movie until many years later as a teenager, and suddenly everything clicked into place — those two nice British girls with whom he used to play and share lunch in between takes? They were ax-murdered ghosts who wanted his soul. That nice Jack Nicholson man who did a funny tomahawk dance when Lloyd accidentally wandered on set one day? Jack was slobberingly hacking his way through a bathroom door to murder Lloyd’s onscreen mother only moments prior.


That must have been the biggest mindfuck of his life.

Clever way to put a kid in a scary movie and still keep his innocence if you ask me. Now he’s got bragging rights for being in a classic.

finalzidane-x:

nyx-010:

horroriskiller:

The boy who played Danny in “The Shining” had no idea he was filming for a horror movie. From Cracked: 

Lloyd just thought they were making a movie about a family in a hotel. He wasn’t even really sure how much he was getting paid to be there. He was only ever shown severely edited footage that took out all the scary parts, which essentially means he thought he was filming the most boring snoozefest ever created, because without the iconic scenes of terror, The Shining is a movie about three people wandering around in cavernous, brooding silence.

Lloyd didn’t see the actual uncut movie until many years later as a teenager, and suddenly everything clicked into place — those two nice British girls with whom he used to play and share lunch in between takes? They were ax-murdered ghosts who wanted his soul. That nice Jack Nicholson man who did a funny tomahawk dance when Lloyd accidentally wandered on set one day? Jack was slobberingly hacking his way through a bathroom door to murder Lloyd’s onscreen mother only moments prior.

That must have been the biggest mindfuck of his life.

Clever way to put a kid in a scary movie and still keep his innocence if you ask me. Now he’s got bragging rights for being in a classic.

(via toocooltobehipster)

(Source: excepttheeyes, via hybrid-cult)

(Source: ed-ingle, via how-lame-i-am)

Tags: fun hitler

faerybites:

☾☆

Robert Taylor in Camille (1936)

(Source: ohrobbybaby)

Laimītes rudenim

Laimītes rudenim

oodmoriarty:

I get there. I get to the cave and there you are. You’re sitting down, you’re leaning on a rock and I think “Thank God. He’s okay, he’s okay.” But then I get close. I see the Swiss army knife I’d got you for your birthday. You’re covered in blood. So much blood. I take you in my arms and I run with you in my arms. I run and run and run but it’s- I can’t because you’re… I can’t, son.

(via hxcfairy)

Hero

(Source: iamnevertheone, via hybrid-cult)

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Best Tumblr Responses 

feredir:

WILL NO

(via hxcfairy)

lillipore12345:

Ezra Miller

lillipore12345:

Ezra Miller

(via thesappiest)

likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother

"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different storyparticularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 

Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 

In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 

The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  

(via josephinepoe)

Tags: art

bashermoriarty:

Michael Fassbender in Frank (2014)

(via fassysource)

nevver:

Andy, take my picture.